January 2016 - Alaska Fishology - Kenai River Salmon Fishing Guide
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January 2016

Net or no Net? That is the Question.

Landing nets have evolved quite a bit over the years, originating in the Stone Age as a simple entrapment made from willow branches, evolving into the wide range of styles used today. No matter how simple or fancy the landing net, the concept remains basically the same; it’s a quicker, easier way to land a fish…. Or is it? Now we could start a debate about the effect of nets on fish when your intention is to catch and release that fish, but I don’t even want to go there right now.  This blog is all about capturing a fish that you intend on keeping as quickly and effectively as possible.  With that in mind, I would argue that a landing net is vital for the vast majority of freshwater species...

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Measuring BIG Kenai River Trout

Measuring boards have a history here on the Kenai River, and that history is due to one simple fact… our trout get HUGE.  We are so spoiled by our spectacular trout fishery that fish up to 20+ inches barely get acknowledged at all, and you can forget about taking the time to actually measure each and every one of them.  But a trout in the 25-30+ inch range, those are the fish that get a Kenai trout fisherman’s attention!  When a special fish like this graces us with its presence and provides  us an opportunity to take a closer look, we want to capture every last detail possible.  We want to know the length, the girth, the unique spotting pattern, the intensity of the stripe, and we definitely want to get...

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The Indicator Swing

Remember like 5 or 10 years ago when you knew that one dude that had a Spey rod and he kind-of knew how to cast it, and every time you witnessed him pull off a Snap-T it was like you had just witnessed the most amazing thing anyone has ever seen?  Remember that?  Well, times have changed over the last decade.  Whereas Spey or Switch rods were once a rarity reserved mainly for the most elite & advanced of fly anglers, they are now very common in many parts of the country, and a great number of fly fishermen either dabble with the techniques or have become full-fledged experts by now.  The reason it has gained so much popularity is debatable, but I tend to believe it has something to...

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